A child taken, a mother grieves ( admin posted on April 21st, 2019 )

”It wasn’t just her child they took away, it was also her voice…” An unnamed litigation guardian.EXCLUSIVE
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It is more than three months since Rebecca’s child was taken from her, but the pain is still raw and the decision still impossible for the grieving young mother to fully comprehend.

She had fought hard during the court hearing to keep the little girl who had been the centre of her world for eight years. She had stayed strong through the long days in front of the magistrate and the lawyers, and had kept her composure over more than three hours of testing cross-examination.

But the decision, when it came, cut like a knife. At first, she was speechless with shock. The moment she stepped from the courtroom she collapsed in grief.

“I tried to comfort her like any other decent human being would but she was totally stricken,” says a veteran litigation guardian, who had been at Rebecca’s side throughout the case.

“I told her she was a wonderful person and that she was a good mother but I just felt powerless to help her.”

Rebecca did not lose her child because she was an incompetent or abusive mother. Indeed, the reports from the paediatrician, the psychologist and the family support worker presented in court all acknowledged her love, dedication and capability.

Rebecca has a mild intellectual disability and she lost her child because it was determined that the elderly relatives of her estranged partner – who had challenged for custody of her daughter – would make better parents.

Now Rebecca has access to her daughter only on alternate weekends and for part of school holidays – a decision which she cannot appeal and about which she must remain publicly silent.

Rebecca’s advisers believed they could not resist a decision in favour of her former partner’s family and accepted a consent order. There can be no legal challenge to that order. Their decision was based on potential legal liability and restrictions on the role of a litigation guardian, an appointee whose job is to “stand in the shoes” of a disabled person during court proceedings.

Because of the rules around media reporting of family law matters, we cannot tell you Rebecca’s real name, or that of her daughter. And she is prohibited from speaking to the media about the case and the turmoil she is going through.

After she made a number of anguished and angry phone calls and sent text messages immediately after her daughter was removed, Rebecca was called back to court. There, she was subjected to a further order forbidding her from talking about the case to anyone other than social workers, lawyers and counsellors.

“It wasn’t just her child they took away, it was also her voice,” says her litigation guardian, who also cannot be named. “She was distressed. There was a bit of language but it wasn’t threatening.”

The case has deeply concerned lawyers and human rights workers, who believe Rebecca is the victim of an inflexible Australian Family Law Act that discriminates against disabled parents in breach of United Nations conventions protecting the rights of the disabled and children.

For some, there are disturbing parallels with the “stolen generations” – the Aboriginal children forcibly removed by the state because their parents were deemed incapable of properly caring for them.

Victoria’s Public Advocate, Colleen Pearce, has written to the Human Rights Commission and the federal Attorney-General raising alarm at the separation a child and her natural mother when no evidence was produced that the child was at risk of harm or neglect.

She told Disability Discrimination Commissioner Graham Innes of her “serious concerns that the processes and outcome of the case breach the human rights of this young woman and her child”.

Rebecca’s litigation guardian believes Rebecca and her daughter have suffered a serious miscarriage of justice.”I think this is an appalling way to treat a person with a very mild disability who is doing her best and her best is judged to be not good enough,” says the woman, one of the most experienced in her field in Victoria.

She described Rebecca as an “average young mother”, a sociable person with a strong network of friends and a supportive mother of her own. “She does not come across as having a disability.”

The child’s paternal relatives, who had shared parenting responsibilities before the relationship between Rebecca and the girl’s father ended, had applied to the Federal Magistrates Court for an order granting them “residence” and parenting responsibility for the child.

“Reports from the paediatrician, the psychologist and the family support worker all indicated that things were going well, that she was a good mother, a caring mother and that this little girl was not at risk,” the guardian says.

The case had then turned on the “better parenting standard” under the Family Law Act, which requires a court to determine what is in the best interests of the child.

“That’s where we got caught. The act assumes the parties are normally the natural parents and where that is not the case it doesn’t give preference to a natural parent. And it does not give protection to someone with a cognitive disability. It treats disability as a barrier to parenting just like drug addiction is a barrier.

“If she didn’t have a mild intellectual disability, I am sure that her child would still be living with her. It is wrong at every level.”

She says Rebecca has now lost her supporting parent’s benefit, and been forced to move from the country to be closer to her child, who is struggling to cope with the change in her life.

“This has been a devastating experience, but people with disabilities get used to being beaten up by systems. They get used to being denigrated and being treated as incapable. They come to expect it.

“At times during the court hearing she would say, ‘I just can’t do this. It is too difficult’. But she did because she loved and wanted to keep her child. That’s what has made this all the more devastating. She hung in there, but she lost her child anyway.”

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Clarke limps, Australia chases win ( admin posted on April 21st, 2019 )

David Warner opens up on his way to another half-century. Michael Clarke injured.
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SRI LANKA 336 & 2-65 (Karuanaratne 30, Sangakkara 18*, Watson 1-10) trailing AUSTRALIA 5-450 dec and 278 (Warner 68, Clarke 57, Herath 5-95) by 327 runs at Bellerive Oval, Hobart. Stumps, day four.

Live scores

AUSTRALIA needs eight final-day wickets in Hobart to record its first Test win of the summer against Sri Lanka, but will have to do it with Ben Hilfenhaus and Michael Clarke both shackled by injury.

Sri Lanka was set a victory target of 393 after Australia was dismissed for 278 just before tea on day four at Bellerive Oval. The home team seemed on track to easily set a 400-plus target as Michael Clarke produced a sparkling half-century from only 43 deliveries. Shortly after that milestone, however, the captain was forced to retire with what Cricket Australia confirmed was a suspected right-hamstring injury.

Last summer he injured the same hamstring and missed part of the ODI tri-series, in which Ricky Ponting temporarily resumed the captaincy before his omission.

Despite the injury Clarke took his place in the slips for the entire final session as Sri Lanka began its chase. His presence was not entirely positive for Australia as he squandered a straightforward opportunity to remove Kumar Sangakkara for three off Nathan Lyon, barely even getting his hands to the thigh-high chance.

Sri Lanka will start day five at 2-65 with its two great batsmen, Kumar Sangakkara (18 not out) annd captain Mahela Jayawardene (5 not out), at the crease.

If was to score another 328 runs and claim victory it would clearly be a record for it. On the 19 occasions it has chased in a Test outside the subcontinent it has won only twice, in England in August 1998 and in Zimbabwe in December 1999. In both matches its victory target was only 35.

Australia’s final-session breakthroughs on day four were made by Shane Watson and Mitch Starc. Watson had first-innings century-maker Tillakaratne Dilshan caught behind for 11 from his first delivery, which pitched on off-stump and seamed away from the right-hander. Starc produced a great example of his most threatening delivery, a fast yorker, to bowl left-hander Dimuth Karunaratne for 30.

Australia made a great start to day four at Bellerive Oval with openers David Warner (68) and Ed Cowan (56) contributing a century partnership, their second in Tests, but fell within four overs of each other late in the first session.

Phillip Hughes (16), Watson (5) and Matthew Wade (11) all feel cheaply after lunch as Australia chased quick runs, seemingly with an eye to a declaration.

Australia’s batting was steadied, yet again, by Clarke and Mike Hussey (31 not out). They added 57 runs promptly, with Clarke particularly effective. The captain reached his half-century from just 43 deliveries in another imperious batting display.

In the same over that Clarke passed 50 he turned Chanaka Welegedara to forward square-leg for two runs and then immediately called for the attention of team physiotherapist Alex Kountouris. Within a minute Clarke had retired his innings and was leaving the ground, with Cricket Australia confirming it was due to a suspected right hamstring injury that was to be formally scanned after the end of play.

After Clarke’s departure Australia’s tailenders tried to hit out to support Hussey. Even the injured Hilfenhaus chose to bat but Sri Lanka nevertheless kept the target to under 400.

Left-arm spinner Herath recovered from his wicket-less first innings to claim 5-95 in the second and increase the likelihood he will finish ahead of England’s Graeme Swann as the leading wicket-taker of 2012.

Australia began day four at 0-27 and faced few nervous moments early, comfortably handling for Sri Lankan seamers Shaminda Eranga and Chanaka Welegedara. During their bowling partnership Australia scored 39 runs.

The introduction of the slower but more accurate Angelo Mathews and Nuwan Kulasekera successfully stymied Australia’s scoring rate and triggered an 16-over stint where the home team failed to hit a boundary.

The boundary drought was broken when left-armer Welegedara was introduced. His first bounce was an appetising bouncer that Warner comfortably pulled to the square-leg boundary to move to 52, marking the first time he had scored consecutive Test half-centuries.

Australia scored notable boundaries in each of the next three overs. In the 38th Warner blasted Rangana Herath over wide long-on for six, in the 39th Cowan cut Welegedara behind point for his half-century – which featured eight boundaries, double what Warner managed in his milestone – but clearly the most notable occurred in the 40th.

As left-arm spinner Herath was about to deliver Warner employed a switch hit, a tactic he had previously reserved for limited-overs internationals. Instead of the ball pitching outside leg-stump and spinning further away it was perfect in his new stance to swat through the vacant forward square-leg region for a right-hander, which was technically cover-point in his customary stance.

Herath, to that stage wicketless in the match, got his revenge in the next over when he elicited an edge from Warner, who was trying the cut off the back foot, that was well caught by wicketkeeper Prasanna Jayawardene.

Three overs’ later Welegedara provided another reminder of his ability to provide the occasional gem of a delivery. Left-hander Cowan, like Hughes in the first innings, tried to defend a ball angled into him from Welegedara only to be decisively bowled between bat and pad.

Apart from Herath’s haul the main highlight from Sri Lanka in the field were produced by the visitors’ wicketkeeper. Prasanna Jayawardene made a lightning-quick stumping of Watson off Herath and then later took a brilliant one-handed diving catch to remove Siddle from the bowling of Welegedara.

HIGHEST FOURTH INNINGS TOTALS TO WIN A TEST AFTER AUSTRALIA SET SRI LANKA 393 TO WIN AT BELLERIVE   7-418 – West Indies v Australia, St John’s, 20034-414 – South Africa v Australia, Perth, 20084-406 – India v West Indies, Port of Spain, 19763-404 – Australia v England, Leeds, 19484-387 – India v England, Chennai, 2008

HIGHEST FOURTH INNING TOTALS – SRI LANKA410 – v Australia, Hobart, 2007 (lost)4-391 – v Pakistan, Colombo, 2009 (draw)9-352 – v South Africa, Colombo, 2006 (won)348 – v Australia, Hobart, 1989 (lost)6-344 – v New Zealand, Hamilton, 1991 (draw)

HIGHEST SUCCESSFUL RUN CHASE IN HOBART6-369 – Australia v Pakistan, 1999

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Liar, fraudster, con-man – and that’s the victim ( admin posted on April 21st, 2019 )

Mark Imbrogno leaves court in August. Nazar Karabidian was earlier found guilty by a jury.
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Lee Rix leaves the County Court in August.

Two men who kidnapped, injured and made extortion threats to a self-confessed liar, con-man and fraudster were today each jailed by a Melbourne judge for five years.

Mark Imbrogno and Nazar Karabidian were earlier found guilty by a jury, which heard Lee Rix lied as easily as he breathed.

Judge Phillip Coish today told the pair the kidnap in broad daylight was a “brazen act” and that they had “taken the law into your own hands” as he sentenced each to three years behind bars.

Judge Coish found the purpose of that offence was to try to “bring the victim to account” for the money he owed Karabidian and to force him to repay it.

Two days before the pair assaulted and kidnapped “a terrified” Rix in Geelong in 2010, Karabidian profusely thanked Imbrogno – “my shadow and right arm” – for his trust, respect and loyalty.

Prosecutor Diana Manova said Karabidian had enlisted Imbrogno because of his size, readiness for violence and preparedness to pressure Rix, 51, to repay money.

In her trial opening, Ms Manova said Rix, who is also known by three other names, owed at the time $500,000 to various people and in May, 2010, was hiding from Karabidian.

Ms Manova said Karabidian, 38, repeatedly asked Rix for money, which a witness would say was $400,000, but he had refused to pay it back.

Rix had phoned a friend to have her ask Karabidian for more time, which she did, but later Karabidian told her he had a friend that people called the “flesh eater” because he took his tool box with him and drilled people’s flesh, Ms Manova said.

After weeks of repeatedly requesting money from Rix, Karabidian and Imbrogno, 41, found him in Geelong, attacked him and drove him to Thornbury.

Ms Manova said Imbrogno cut Rix’s face and threatened him with a screwdriver before they drove to Anglesea, secretly followed by the police special operations group.

It was there, in a caravan as the three ate pizzas, drank beer and watched the Brownlow Medal count, that the SOG arrested the men and freed Rix.

The jury found Imbrogno and Karabidian guilty of intentionally injuring and kidnapping Rix and extorting him with threats of inflicting injury.

During the County Court trial the jury heard about the man called the “flesh-eater” who drilled people’s bodies, Karabidian’s respect for Imbrogno and how Rix, a self-confessed liar, con-man and fraudster, hid from Karabidian because he owed him about $400,000.

Barristers for both men, who pleaded not guilty and who did not give evidence, disputed Rix’s claims and attacked him as a witness without credit.

In evidence, Rix said Karabidian was then his best friend, a fellow gambler, they worked in finance together and the pair often owed one another money.

He told Ms Manova he agreed to get in the car with Karabidian “if he keeps Mark away” because he was terrified of him.

After leaving Thornbury together, Rix said they drove to Anglesea and went to a pizza shop.

He told the jury: ” … and when we were doing that … I found it a bit strange, when I was in the pizza shop, I still had bloodstained, you know, there was … my lip was split open, I was bleeding, it was pretty obvious I’d been in something.

“They didn’t seem to notice, or the pizza shop went around like nothing was happening. And then we walked along the main street of Anglesea.”

They bought beer and started eating the pizza in the caravan and “then I think the Brownlow came on, you know the count”.

Rix said he told Imbrogno to go outside to smoke a cigarette and then Karabidian got a phone call and “I could hear ‘get on the floor, get on the floor’, and I looked up and Mark had red dots on his chest and people yelling at him to get down and take his hands out of his pockets …”

The SOG had announced their appearance.

He agreed with David Glynn, for Imbrogno, he had lied to and tricked people out of money over 15 years, but denied his “entire story” of abduction and extortion was a “pack of lies”.

He agreed he had defrauded people in at least two states of thousands of dollars – and was now wanted in NSW – and once entered a bank and asked the manager “if I could have $50,000 because I was being threatened”.

But Rix admitted that was a lie and he had done that because he had a debt.

Mr Glynn asked: “Let me put to you that you are a very successful liar, what do you say about that?”

“I’ve got nothing to say about it,” he replied.

Mr Glynn: “In fact I suggest that lying to you comes about as natural as breathing?”

Rix: “I don’t agree.”

Mr Glynn: “I suggest to you that you’re the sort of person who could sell ice to the Eskimos?”

Rix: “I’m a trained salesman.”

Rix denied a suggestion by Terry Sullivan, for Karabidian, that a woman whose child had cancer begged him for some of the money he owed her so the child could have a scan.

He agreed with Dr Sullivan he had “good persuasive skills” when selling something, but said it was wrong to suggest that when he took money from people did not have a conscience about it.

In her final address, Ms Manova told the jury no one liked con-men or liars, but “you are not here to like or dislike anyone”, rather to act impartially without emotion, fear or prejudice.

The judge said in his sentencing remarks that Karabidian was the instigator and organiser of the kidnapping who had enlisted Imbrogno’s help.

Judge Coish said Imbrogno was an active and willing participant who had acted aggressively and violently.

He said Rix had a long history of owing money to people and that because of the offences his previous state of paranoia had worsened.

Rix now experienced difficulty sleeping and was depressed, anxious and lonely.

Judge Coish said Imbrogno had developed a strong bond with Karabidian who had encouraged and supported him in late 2009 when he was unemployed and at a low ebb.

Letters from his wife, mother and a priest showed a good side to Imbrogno’s character, the judge said.

Character witnesses described Karabidian as a gregarious man who helped people out and who maintained good relations with his wife and son.

The judge said offences of this type must be discouraged and assessed both men’s rehabilitation prospects as “reasonably good”.

He ordered both to serve a minimum of three years less 112 days.

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Piano is key to artistic growth ( admin posted on April 21st, 2019 )

KAREN Williams is to be applauded for promoting appropriate development to revitalise the CBD of Cleveland. However, Cleveland already has so much infrastructure awaiting utilisation.
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It has a rail link to the city. With this, Cleveland has access to the whole world literally. It has the bay and a jetty already in Raby Bay to allow visitors access the impressive and extensive waterways of Moreton Bay. The bay itself has islands, beaches and communities each with their own identity.

The uncut diamond in the crown of the Redlands is the Redlands Performing Arts Centre or the concert hall, as I call it.

Perhaps not everyone knows what a treasure we have here. Those who have attended an event in the auditorium will have found the venue has among the best acoustics of any medium sized hall in Australia. The building is also attractive, its seating comfortable and its setting adjacent to the Black Swamp bushland reserve really is unique and reflective of the natural environment of the Redlands.

It is the perfect place for concerts and stage performances of almost any genre classical music, jazz, theatre, indigenous music and dance, musicals or ballet. It is also so accessible and inviting a contrast to the rather tangled mess that has become of QPAC and its environs at South Bank.

I consider our concert hall could host (now please, I am not a snob these are my preferences) medium size orchestral concerts, jazz ensembles, ballet, theatre and above all chamber music. It is the perfect venue for chamber music and would make an ideal hub for a chamber music festival.

Such events the Australian Festival of Chamber Music in Townsville, for example draw literally thousands of visitors each year, visitors from all over the world who stay in hotels, eat at the restaurants and enjoy the waters of Cleveland Bay in winter in North Queensland. The musical workshops and master classes provide expert training by the best musicians to local students.

They also bring in dollars. Why should we not have something similar here?

However, until the concert hall has a piano, it is a cathedral without the stained glass windows. A piano will allow not just my possibly eclectic choice of music, but also jazz, lunch time jam sessions, song recitals, old time favourites, dance music the limits set only by the demands of the audience. A piano is the key that will open the door of new opportunities in RPAC.

Chris Ayres, Wellington Point

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Carols by Candlelight  ( admin posted on April 21st, 2019 )

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park
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Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

Hosted by the Rotary Club of Dubbo West, residents of Dubbo celebrated Carols by Candlelight at No1 Oval Victoria Park

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Travel Tale: A family history journey ( admin posted on March 22nd, 2019 )

Rosie Douglas lives in the Lower Inman Valley. Sheemigrated to Australia from England with her parentswhen she was three.
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At the time, she had no idea of the painful memories her father, William Epps,was leaving behind in his homeland. Given up to the Foundling Hospital, Britain’s first home for abandoned children, at just two months old, it wasn’t until William was well into his adulthood that he discovered the truth about where he came from.

Rosie told her story, as part of the Travel Tales promotion.

The trip in 2011was like apilgrimagefor me. It was the first time I had been to the Foundling Hospital, which is in the centre of London.

There were lots of people at the reunion, many of them aged in their 80s. They referred to themselves at ‘inmates’. The reunion was part of the healing process for them. There were some very sad stories.

My father was placed in the hospital when he was two months old. His mother was 21 when she had him but her own mother fell pregnant around the same time so dad was put into ‘care’. Parents who put their children at the Foundling Hospital thought they could get their children back but this wasn’t the case. Every year, his mother, whose name was Lily Lyon, visited the hospital on his birthday but she was never allowed to see him. Dad never received the presents she left for him.

It turned out, they had changed his name. Dad was actually born George Lyon but his name was changed to William Epps. This was commonplace, to stop parents from tracing their children. By the time dad was an adult and the confidential papers were released, it was too late. He never met his mother. She had already died.

My dad was given a set ofnumbers when he was taken to the hospital, which he passed on to me. At the reunion, I found a man whose numbers were only eight digits different to my father’s. His name was Burt Bunt.

I visited Burt in his home and met his family and he gave me some photos. Burt’s son, Gary Bunt, lived next door and he said he was artist. I expressed my own interest in art so Gary invited me over to see his studio. We spent some time talking and he gave me a signed book. It wasn’t until later I discovered what a well-known artist Gary was.

Read more about the Foundling Hospital here.

I also took time to visit the church in Itchingfield, West Sussex where my parents were married.

I would recommend this type of trip to others astracing your family history takes you toplaces you wouldn’t normally go.I want to go back and hear more stories. I travelled on my own and spent one month abroad.

The church at Itchingfield, West Sussex where my great-grandparents & grandparents are buried. The honour rolls on the walls of the church name my uncles who died in both world wars. A tree in the background has a arrow embedded in it from the Robin Hood days.

Rosie Douglas on the Thames London Bridge.

Artist Gary Bunt in his studio.

Captain Thomas Coram (c. 1668 – 29 March 1751) was a philanthropist who created the London Foundling Hospital.

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The 63rd Young National Cherry Festival gallery ( admin posted on March 22nd, 2019 )

The 63rd National Cherry Festival. The 63rd National Cherry Festival.
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The 63rd National Cherry Festival.

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Gallery: Bendigo region cricket, Dec 15 & 16 ( admin posted on March 22nd, 2019 )

BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough
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BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Bendigo v Strathdale-Maristians. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

EVCA. Golden Gully v West Bendigo. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

BDCA. Golden Square v Eaglehawk. Picture: Julie Hough

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Drivers warned: Pay attention to fatal five ( admin posted on February 21st, 2019 )

Surviving the fatal five… Police are out to stop distracted drivers, particularly those using mobile phones. Wynnum Traffic Branch s Constable Scott Knijff is one of many police who will be enforcing the rules this Christmas. Photo by Chris McCormackDRIVER inattention has become the latest addition to bad behaviour on our roads, joining drink-driving, speed, seatbelts and fatigue as the major causes of accidents on the state’s roads.
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Police added distraction to the list, upgrading the Fatal Four to the Fatal Five, at the launch of this year’s Christmas road safety campaign.

While using mobile phones when behind the wheel is a major cause of distraction, driver inattention covers actions including changing the radio station, putting on make up and eating breakfast.

In Wynnum District, which spans Wynnum to Redland Bay and the bay islands, police have fined 593 motorists for using a mobile phone while driving.

During November, police fined 41 drivers who were caught either talking on a mobile phone, texting or checking social media sites while driving.

Wynnum District Superintendent Jim Keogh said drivers were constantly lulled into a false sense of security believing they were capable of using a mobile phone, eating or doing any other distracting task while driving.

“(Drivers can be confident) because they haven’t had an accident in quite a number of years,” he said.

“What they don’t realise is that once they are in a volatile situation leading up to an accident the circumstances are unforgiving.

“It’s very hard to regain control of your car once you’ve lost control. That’s what happens.”

Police Minister Jack Dempsey said the Fatal Five message was clear.

“Everyone would be happy if there were zero (road deaths) and police would be happy if they didn’t have to write another ticket out,” he said.

“The fact is, out of all of the deaths on our roads, a lot of those deaths could have been avoidable.”

Mr Dempsey said a fatal accident also affects the lives of police, firemen and paramedics who attend the crash.

“It really affects everyone from emergency services to the community,” he said.

“If people want to be free-spirited or walk on the wild-side they can go and climb a mountain or go fishing out in the bay.

“There’s lots of other ways you can seek thrills, and not put your life or other lives at risk.”

Mr Dempsey said 96,000 Queensland drivers in the past three years had been fined for driving distracted.

“(Using phones while driving) is almost becoming addictive,” he said.

“No phone call or Tweet is worth a life or an injury. People should simply put their phone away in a vehicle. Whatever they may have to do on a phone, it’s not worth the pain and suffering.”

The state-wide Christmas road safety campaign runs from December 12 to February 4.

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Anxious wait is over ( admin posted on February 21st, 2019 )

THE wait is over for more than 82,000 students who received their Victorian Certificate of Education subject results from 7am yesterday.
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Gippsland Grammar dux for 2012 is MatisseValette, from Maffra.Matisse obtained an ATAR score of 99.25, with4 scores over 40, including a 47 in French, whichMatisse obtained in 2011.

Executive principal Mike Clapper said thisyear’s results were another strong performance

for the school.

The school’s mean Australian Tertiary Admission Rank score was 78.5, wellup with the average over the past 10 years, whilethe median was 81.65.24 per cent of studentsobtained an ATAR score of over 90 putting themin the top 10 per cent of the state.

With an ATAR score of 94.65, Rebecca Copper was Sale College’sdux.

The dux at CatholicCollege Sale was Ashleigh Whitehill with an ATAR of 97.35.

The dux at Maffra Secondary College wasPatrick Elliott with97.5.

Education Minister Martin Dixon said it was an exciting time for students and their families who could now celebrate their achievements after a challenging year.

“Congratulations to all the students who have received their results today – whether they are getting single subjects scores or graduating with their VCE – they should be very proud of what they have accomplished,” Mr Dixon said.

“Completing the VCE requires dedication and sacrifice, and students should now take the time to relax and reflect on this huge achievement.

“VCE is a collective effort and I’d also like to thank the parents, teachers and school staff who have guided, encouraged and supported students throughout their journey.”

Mr Dixon said it was important for students to seek advice if their results were not what they expected.

Students have until noon on December 24 to change their university and TAFE course preferences.

VCE and VCAL results will arrive in the mail from today.

Students have been able to access their results via the internet or by SMS if they pre-registered.

Eligible students could also access their ATAR via the internet and SMS from 7am yesterday.

Students with questions can phone the Post Results and ATAR Service on 9651 4640 or 1800 653 080 from 9am to 5pm today and tomorrow.

For more in the release of VCE results read Tuesday’s Gippsland Times.

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